Following the music: The joy ride

Following Music: The Joy Ride

I realized I wanted to play the drums when I was 3 years old. It was seeing Vinnie Paul playing drums in the “Cemetery Gates” video. From then on, I hit on everything that I could. Chairs, tables, my brother, friends, you name it. It just became a drum. I love music too but I am drawn to the drums first and foremost.

I went through school band and hated it. I am not a fan of music being so restricted. From there I got my first drum set, which took me to places I could only dream about. I got to open for national acts, play festivals, play bars, break online radio records, and so much more. The times weren’t always fun and easy going.

In 2010 I quit a band. I will not go into all of it but I thought that I was done. That band almost killed me. I hated everything, including myself. There were sections of that time that I didn’t touch or even look at the drums. I just couldn’t. There I happened to go to guitar center and everything changes.

In 2012 I bought an electric drum set.  I had just moved into an apartment and needed to be quiet but the itch came back. I needed to play the drums again. The learning curve was steep and it still doesn’t feel like a real drum. The fact is, I can play again. By the end of that year I was in a Viking metal band and it had dissolved.

All was not over, I decided to build a studio in my apartment. I still can’t believe that it’s really a thing in my life. I can make music whenever I want. It is one of the most liberating things a musician can have. I also started teaching myself guitar and bass because Of my new goals. I want to write an album that only has me on it. That would be amazing! However, things have taken a twist and now I have The Local Music Revolution.

I started the podcast because I wanted to talk to my friends about music. Recording it sounded fun so I went with it. Before I knew it the idea took off on it’s own and now I have a podcast that is fairly successful; more successful than I imagined.

I know its long winded but my point is being made. You have to be ok with going for the ride. Music isn’t just one hill and you’ve seen it all. There are many twists and turns. You might end up doing something that you never thought you would do. Like writing a blog post for and editing a podcast. You never know; just enjoy the ride.

 

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Drugs and booze

this happened

Recently, one of My favorite Bands had what all media Sources Calla Meltdown on stage. More Recently, there has been talk that alcholhad a part to Play in it. Now, I do drink on occasionBut not when music is involved. Personally, I feel numbto theexpirence. I don’t really about the others in the band as long as the drinking doesn’t getIn the way of progress. It Better not get in the way, .

There are many arguments that are for Drinking or drugs. The one I hate the most is, that it helps get the creative Juices flowing. I dont’get the Idea Behind this! Drugs and alcohol lowers inhibition! It lowers your ability to see that your off time or you’re not playing to your ability. Why would you do that to yourself and your fans? I don’t get it. To, me it just cheapens the experience of the music and the flow.

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Rock and metal in the mainstream

Hard rock and Metal in the mainstream

I get it…

You don’t want your favorite band to get bigger than you. Right now, they are your secret. You can keep them in your in your pocket. That’s fine. I have felt that way many times before BUT everything changes. We all evolve and move forward. So should the bands. Don’t be hard on them for advancing! That is what a sub-culture like metal needs

 

Selling out or buying in?

                When bands hit milestones they tend to lose some fans. It’s a sad, unfortunate process but it happens. It becomes cool to hate these bands. We saw this when Metallica put out “One” and when the put out EVERYTHING after “ …And Justice for All”. We also saw this when Slayer was found out, Oops, the satanic gimmick was in fact just a gimmick! They are boring dudes! They also just happened to make music a career for 30+ years! Bands get big and their “True Fans” become , well, not fans. It is something that continues to baffle me!

The need for flag bearers

Rock and Metal are sub-cultures. Pop is really short for Popular culture. This is when popstars make millions a year and metal just struggles to limp by. There are rock and metal bands that are a bridge to the gap. Foo Fighters, Ozzy, AC/DC, Avenged Sevenfold and Five Finger Death Punch are some that have that ability. These bands are flying the flag of our culture! They are acceptable to most. We need to have that and be proud of the ones that make it that far.

Why?

Because, as long as we have musicians within the eyes of the pop culture audience , we can move and expand.

 

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For booking: thelocalmusicrevolution@gmail.com

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Writing Styles

Writing Styles

When I started in music I was in regular school band. I couldn’t stand it and I cannot stand playing someone else’s music. That’s just my personality. Even back then I wanted to write my own music. Since then I have been in many different bands and in many different writing scenarios.

There are many ways to write a song and there are many different structures for a song. The thing is, the way a song comes together is subjective. Whatever works for you!

When I was in bands, I would jam or write with them. I let the individual musicians come up with their part and try to make constructive critiques. Now, it’s a different story. I’m by myself and write everything.

On my first album I was learning everything and I was telling myself I could do it. I started with drums and didn’t use a metronome. I can see now where all the problems are but I did it and I learned. That was exciting time for me.

During the writing for the Creation EP and The Pawn and The King, I did the same thing with the drums and no metronome. This time the guitars sound more confident and the bass can even be heard more.

For the newest album I started writing lyrics first. I wanted to know exactly what the feeling of the song was going to be. Then I spent a few months relearning how to play to metronome. That was the hardest part. It took all of my patience.

When I finally started writing I worked on guitar demos that had a click track behind it. With that I went to the drums. I would spend as long as I needed on the drums. If it didn’t feel right , I would go back and change it.

Once the drums were tracked I would work on my guitars. The tone was set before anything. I would hook up my DI box and amp so that I could get clear direct and distorted signals. Bass was DI to the interface. Last thing would be vocals. I used an SM57 and an XM990 to get the vocals. That is how I wrote and recorded Fallout.

 

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Lifestyle VS Addiction

The is a song from a band called Crossfade called “Cold”. It is a really good song but the video gets me every time. It shows the singer neglecting his girlfrends for music. It alwo shows cables in the wock drawer and a guitar in the bed. Insignificant to most but very familiar to musicians. I, being a drummer, had and still have drums everywhere in my apartment. That is just the nature of the beast.

The bigger problem is the neglect of everything else in life. I have been there. When I was in a working band my brain really had only one speed, music. I did neglect a lot but I always made it a point of having my family enjoy all of the thing I was doing to. The extra seats were always offered to family before anyone else.

This, however, still happens. I fear that my wife is the one that gets the worst of it. She is and always has been very supportive but sometimes I go to far. I can’t help it. It happens when I am writing or have a project going. I just zone out and everything else takes a back seat.

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Fun VS Seriousness

Music Ethics: Fun VS Seriousness

This topic is strictly debate. Do you take music serious or do you play an instrument to have fun? There is a line and in my humble opinion, good musicians can play jump rope with that line. I may be the only one with this view but that view helped me make friends and succeed with all of my musical goals. It is actually not hard to figure out the line and which side of it you need to be on.

For me music is everything from therapy to a way to meditate to a way to just get away from the rest of the world. That being said I take music very serious and try to respect the craft. Honestly I am only really serious when making decisions and things of that nature. The majority of the time I am having a blast. Playing music should really be that, playing. I try to be excited and curious about everything that pertains to music.

During writing, planning and business time are the only real point where I get down to business and get things done. During writing and recording for my release, Against All Odds I didn’t start getting serious until about halfway through. It wasn’t until the first song “A King in my Mind” was done that everything started becoming real. About this point is the same time that I got the idea for the current project I am working. I try to be serious away from the studio because it just kills my vibe.

I truly believe that being and artist is like being a small child. You should be curious and question EVERYTHING! If this way isn’t working try another way. When I was working on odds I was just trying to find a handle. I was learning, I am still learning. The best part is that the insecurity also fuels the curiosity. Why not hang on to that?

There are people that take music serious to a point where it stucks the life out of the music. I have practiced countless hours on the drums. I can do everything I was and I am still learning things. That’s came at a cost and that is putting music out there. The first recordings I was a part of were horrid. At one point we used a computer mic, just terrible. There is a Dave Grohl quote going aroubd that really says that you need to suck in the beginning. It’s called paying your dues. As time progresses things always get better.

I don’t understand this mentality. Why does everthing have to be perfect? We make mistakes. I know for a fact that Odds was full of them. Rather than obsessing and damping my enjoyment I released the work. I just made note about the problems so I don’t do it again. The mistakes should not hold you back. Just learn from the imperfections.

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For booking: thelocalmusicrevolution@gmail.com

The podcast is sponsored by Stringjoy.com

A podcast for local music and the companies and individuals that help those bands.

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